GO AHEAD AND TOUCH MY ZIPPER

Guuuuuuurl.

“Listening to the timbre of the conversations at the Dane County Farmers Market, one of the largest in the country, you’d think the topic was vaccination or Gaza. “What exactly is in this scone?” “Are your emus happy? How much space do they have to roam free?” “When you say ‘flour’ on the label, what kind of flour is that?”

Yet food pantries remain full of the same canned pumpkin and expired boxed meals they always have. Obese people are shamed and told what to eat, while people deemed skinny enough to have an eating disorder are also shamed for not taking care of their “health.” There is a serious disconnect here that should tell anyone who’s paying attention that this is not about justice or health in any form––it is about vanity.

When asking the server how the animal being served was prepared, no one seems to wonder whether that server has basic health insurance or whether that server is affected by the fact that the restaurant industry has one of the highest rates of sexual harassment and lowest rates of pay. When waxing poetic about the “salt of the Earth” farmers from which they buy their unpasteurized milk, no one seems to worry that an estimated 10 percent of American farm workers are children. When pearl-clutching over the things we “don’t know” about GMOs, as Kavin pointed out, no one seems to be concerned about their presence in groceries found at Price Rite––only products sold at Whole Foods.

If you are not as concerned about the people handing you your food in the restaurant as you are about the pigs on the farm where it was grown, your approach is classist….If you start telling someone all about your new trendy diet or asking them about theirs without knowing if they have an eating disorder that may be triggered by your prattle, your approach is ableist. If you tsk-tsk at people who are overweight for what they are eating and claim you’re concerned about their health, yet you’re not actively campaigning to make healthy food more accessible and affordable, your approach is sickening and I don’t want you in my activism.”

(Source: commanderrogers, via sekoshi)

completely-dunn:

wifipassworcl:

thepottertardis:

apertures413thdoctor:

pleatedjeans:

via

Ellen what the fuck happened in 1998

ellen degeneres came out in 1997

yeah but ellen what happened in 2014

ellen page came out in 2014

completely-dunn:

wifipassworcl:

thepottertardis:

apertures413thdoctor:

pleatedjeans:

via

Ellen what the fuck happened in 1998

ellen degeneres came out in 1997

yeah but ellen what happened in 2014

ellen page came out in 2014

(via owlmylove)

Ahaha they cut my hours (my income) at work in half so they could rehire someone from 3 years ago and give them 38 hours per week right off the bat. I had to work alongside them today, and they refused to listen to me about anything. That included equipment new to them that I absolutely know more about. I had to reclean something three times because they refused to hear a single word I was saying and kept casually spilling milk all over it. 

Since my income has been halved, I no longer have the money to go to a doctor+therapist team and get on antidepressants like I wanted to. I can’t afford to ask for days off, and I don’t have the money to pay for those appointments, period. They fucked me over that badly for someone who completely disrespects me. 

Just 

image

I wouldn’t put this on Tumblr but no one’s home. Whoops. 

To be white, or straight, or male, or middle class is to be simultaneously ubiquitious and invisible. You’re everywhere you look, you’re the standard against which everyone else is measured. You’re like water, like air. People will tell you they went to see a “woman doctor” or they will say they went to see “the doctor.” People will tell you they have a “gay colleague” or they’ll tell you about a colleague. A white person will be happy to tell you about a “Black friend,” but when that same person simply mentions a “friend,” everyone will assume the person is white. Any college course that doesn’t have the word “woman” or “gay” or “minority” in its title is a course about men, heterosexuals, and white people. But we call those courses “literature,” “history” or “political science.”

This invisibility is political.

—   Michael S. Kimmel, in the introduction to the book, “Privilege: A Reader” (via hanntagonist)

(Source: thinkspeakstress, via owlmylove)

Alex Hirsch

yazzydream:

I already quoted this, but it was too good not to clip.

(via sekoshi)

vivacosima:

daily reminder that minerva mcgonagall is metal as fuck

(Source: majesdanes, via owlmylove)

comicsoughtabefun:

Today in Comics History: Scott Pilgrim finally dates a girl his own age
Panels from Scott Pilgrim Gets It Together (October 2007); script, pencils, inks and letters by Bryan Lee O’Malley; colors by Nathan Fairbairn

comicsoughtabefun:

Today in Comics History: Scott Pilgrim finally dates a girl his own age

Panels from Scott Pilgrim Gets It Together (October 2007); script, pencils, inks and letters by Bryan Lee O’Malley; colors by Nathan Fairbairn

(via sekoshi)

Anonymous said: Do you ever think you'll stop drawing fanart? No offense it just seems like the kind of thing you're supposed to grow out of. I'm just curious what your plans/goals are since it isn't exactly an art form that people take seriously.

tamorapierce:

teenlibrariantoolbox:

whovianfeminism:

fallingfromtheshelf:

linzeestyle:

euclase:

Ah, fanart. Also known as the art that girls make.

Sad, immature girls no one takes seriously. Girls who are taught that it’s shameful to be excited or passionate about anything, that it’s pathetic to gush about what attracts them, that it’s wrong to be a geek, that they should feel embarrassed about having a crush, that they’re not allowed to gaze or stare or wish or desire. Girls who need to grow out of it.

That’s the art you mean, right?

Because in my experience, when grown men make it, nobody calls it fanart. They just call it art. And everyone takes it very seriously.

It’s interesting though — the culture of shame surrounding adult women and fandom. Even within fandom it’s heavily internalized: unsurprisingly, mind, given that fandom is largely comprised by young girls and, unfortunately, our culture runs on ensuring young girls internalize *all* messages no matter how toxic. But here’s another way of thinking about it.

Sports is a fandom. It requires zealous attention to “seasons,” knowledge of details considered obscure to those not involved in that fandom, unbelievable amounts of merchandise, and even “fanfic” in the form of fantasy teams. But this is a masculine-coded fandom. And as such, it’s encouraged - built into our economy! Have you *seen* Dish network’s “ultimate fan” advertisements, which literally base selling of a product around the normalization of all consuming (male) obsession? Or the very existence of sports bars, built around the link between fans and community enjoyment and analysis. Sport fandom is so ingrained in our culture that major events are treated like holidays (my gym closes for the Super Bowl) — and can you imagine being laughed at for admitting you didn’t know the difference between Supernatural and The X Files the way you might if you admit you don’t know the rules of football vs baseball, or basketball?

"Fandom" is not childish but we live in a culture that commodified women’s time in such away that their hobbies have to be "frivolous," because "mature" women’s interests are supposed to be caretaking, via marriage, children, and the lives of those within an imagined (generally nuclear) family unit: things that allow others to continue their own special interests, while leaving women without a space of their own.

So think about what you’re actually saying when you call someone “too old” for fandom. Because you’re suggesting they are “too old” for a consuming hobby, and I challenge you to answer — what do you think they should be doing instead?

The gendering of fantoms is fascinating. Just think about how sports fandom permeates our culture, with their cosplay and swag, then come at me and tell me discussing/critiquing/podcasting about media is weird.

This reminds me of that time I had a troll pestering me for a few days trying to tell me that my life was sad because I spent my time “examining [Doctor Who episodes] in excruciating detail.” Because when a guy examines a TV show and writes about it, it’s a proper episode review, but when a girl does it, she’s just a crazy fangirl on Tumblr.

Lots of food for thought here

And yet, when people (admittedly, usually men) spend years of their lives studying the works of the Venerable Bede, Thoreau, Milton, Steinbeck, they are scholars, as are women who do the same with Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Hildegarde von Bingen, Elizabeth I, Catherine the Great, Edith Wharton, Edna S.t Vincent Millay, though with Millay noses are lifted, with all of the women the issues of childbirth and childbirth are raised.  Were they good mothers; were they bad ones.  Were they good homemakers?  No wonder Woolf’s single most famous work is “A Room of One’s Own.”  The men who “let” their wives have room to create are given brownie points; the women who are forced to create time for there husbands’ muses while scrabble to put the bills aren’t much considered, are they, unless they’re congratulated on being so fortunate as to be enthroned by the knee of greatness.  How many “unimportant” careers that might have grown into important ones were left by the side of the road, do you suppose, discarded so a man’s far more important one was given space in which to flourish?